Why Enforce Outgoing Mail Servers?

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Why Enforce Outgoing Mail Servers?

The business workplace is changing. More and more business professionals are working from home and the workplace has transformed into a mobile reality. Broadband has been the catalyst and Internet Service Providers have become big players in the marketplace as a consequence.

If this is true, why do these same companies enforce their customers (us) to use their outgoing mail servers?

If you don’t know what I mean, then I’ll try to explain. If I am using a mail client such as Microsoft Outlook to send mail, my outgoing mail server is set as mail.pctechnix.ie. Eircom for example, has no problem with this. Slap yourself on the back Eircom.

Other Irish Broadband Providers are not so straightforward. Irish Broadband will only allow you to use smtp.irishbroadband.ie and NTL enforce smtp.upcmail.ie. Perlico also have a confusing list of ones you can use. There are more providers that can be added to the guilty list but I’d like to stick to my main point.

These settings will not mean much to most residential users (once they find the settings), especially if their pc remains homebound, but the mobile user has a headache in store. If you take your laptop which has been configured to send mail using one broadband provider and move to another location with broadband provided by another (who enforces their outgoing mail server) then you will have to modify your settings every single time.

I’ll hold my hands up and admit that I don’t understand why they do this. Possibly there’s a valid reason for it? Maybe I’ll delete this post in embarrassment of my own ignorance but this in general does not bode well if you plan on taking your laptop on a road trip.

2017-02-09T13:48:10+00:00 May 9th, 2008|Broadband, Software|5 Comments